Research and Response

Deconstructing secondary research that addresses current practice-related problems, debates and trends can strengthen personal practice by collecting ideas through critical analysis and examination.

Graphic communication has the capability of leading popular culture into new ways of thinking both good and bad, for commerce or awareness. Below is an example of a well researched response to an article about older men and younger women by Noma Bar.

Noma Bar

Fig. 28 Bar (2009) Beware of the Wolves

This illustration alongside an article about older men and younger women is a didactic approach to simplistic design by solving complex issues using space. What is particularly striking in my opinion, is the selection of space and color and the scope of meaning communicated through simplicity and the use of negative space. The use of space and color serve as a way of seeing things through shapes (and meaning) are intellectually conveyed through this engulfment of a young looking and innocent Red Riding Hood being consumed by the sexual desires and ravenous intent of the wolf. The expressive illustration of the eared angle and cross-eyed approach is in agreement with the connotations of rape under the sexual analysis of the original tale stemming back as far as the 10th century.

I believe this type of secondary research into other practitioner’s design solutions can support a broader understanding of current trends and contemporary practices when combined with critical examination, divergent experimentation and observational sketch work. Beyond the deconstruction of the graphic overhead, one must consider whether these systems of thought are dictated through cultures, or controlled by visual communication.  This practice expands epistemology and is vital to a practice led cooperative of visual communication that can expand meaning between historical and contemporary culture’s ever-changing status quo.

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